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Blast From the Past
Volunteers in Action
Next Month's Meeting







 
Loxton Centenary celebrations


See Story & 'photos further on.


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   President
  On Thursday the 30th August the Channel 9 Postcards Team, headed by Ron  Kandelaars, came to visit the Historical Society and filmed for a segment to be shown in October.  The team covered all the galleries of the   museum and were very interested in our vehicle section.

Striping a logos have now been completed on the “new” Highway Patrol Vehicle, with a large logo on the Bedford Van & small logos on each of the motor cycles.  Our  sincere thanks goes to Paul White  from Stickers & Stuff at the Brickworks Markets, for his  expert advice & assistance with  this project.



The Chrysler Royal, Holden Commodore & 2  motorcycles led the Loxton Centenary street parade on the 25th August.  Our dedicated vehicle team left Barracks at 6.00 am on the day & did not return until 7.00 pm .They were a hit with the  locals at both Loxton &   Karoonda, providing a great boost in public relations for both SAPOL & the  Society.







On Friday the 7th September Tony Elliott, whose subject was the “Somerton Beach  Mystery” addressed 46 members at our monthly meeting.













The plaster cast of the mystery man was moved from the Museum to the meeting room to provide a focal point for
the occasion.  Tony is a dynamic speaker who entertained us with various aspects of this baffling mystery.
 
Kevin Beare provided a vote of thanks & presented Tony with a Certificate of   Appreciation & a book.
















Bob Dunn, from the Mounted Operations Group was presented with a Certificate of Appreciation & a book for his outstanding contribution to the success of  Open Day.
  





The Raffle raised $89.00 & the meeting closed with supper.





I look forward to seeing you at our next meeting on the 5th October.


  





  
Geoff Rawson

  President

TOP
  









The first police in the north of South Australia were under Inspector Gordon. In his memoirs, Trooper James McLean describes how they came to the district.

“In the month of January, 1841, I was despatched along with Inspector Gordon, Sergeant Alford, Troopers Prewitt, McCulloch and Lane to form a station on the River Wakefield, Mr. John Horrocks and Mr. E.B. Gleeson having settled there with their stock. We halted to camp near the River Light where we killed a young kangaroo and cooked it, and next afternoon camped at Macaw Creek. Next day we halted on the Wakefield Plains, and remained there for three days, until our baggage came up with Mr. Gleeson’s teams. A number of sappers and miners along with labourers, tents and baggage to commence a survey party also arrived. After this we went up to a bend in the river where Mr. Gleeson had several flocks of sheep. His overseer Sandy McDonald and his wife were there and a number of coolies shepherding. Here we erected a large wurley or shed for our cooking place.”



Sandy McDonald was a former member of the foot police in Adelaide. Later he was a member of the party that accompanied Mr. C.C. Dutton, one-time Sheriff, in an attempted overland trek with his cattle from his station on the West Coast. The party was lost, and in spite of vigorous searching, was never found. Some time later some of the party’s equipment was discovered, and it seems certain that all members perished at the hands of the Aborigines, Sandy McDonald included.
In June, 1842, the first police building in was erected on Hawker’s “Bungaree” sheep run. Work on the police hut began in June, 1842, and by October the roof was being thatched with reeds.
From those early times two official Police Station Journals have survived and recently I was given access to them. An entry from 14 August, 1849, caught my eye, and showed clearly how those early lawmen had to cope with frontier situations of that era.


“P/C Guy having received information that a man was found dead near the Broughton River proceeded to return for the Coroner, P/C Hill proceeded with Dr. Webb to one of Mr. Hawker’s stations to get the man that first saw the body. Proceeded with the man to the Broughton Station and got there at 11 o’clock at night and examined the body which was in a frightful state of decomposition and to all appearances had been dead for some weeks. Took possession of all his papers, and found that by the letter his name was William Blakeway. There were no marks of violence on his body. Stopped the night at one of Mr. Hawker’s stations.
Thursday - P/C Guy proceeded with the coffin, Dr. Webb and carpenter to inter the body, having been duly authorized to do so by Mr. G. Hawker, Esq., the coroner not being able to attend and the body not being in a fit state to remove.
P/C Hill attended the Court and gave in his depositions and delivered up the papers belonging to William Blakeway to G.G. Hawker Esq., to be forwarded to the Commissioner. P/C Guy returned to Clare in the evening with things belonging to the body.”

One wonders if the motto of those early Troopers could not well have been the one applied to the Boy Scout Movement of another century - SEMPER PARATUS” - ALWAYS READY”.







In the mid 1950’s when performing detective duties at the Adelaide C.I.B., I was walking along King William Street and when near the T & G building on the corner of Grenfell Street, Constable Harry Parker approached me and told me that a member of the public employed in a nearby office building in Grenfell Street reported to him that a male person was indecently exposing himself to members of the public. This occurred when they were entering the toilet on the first floor of his building. Constable Parker was then performing traffic control duties at that site.

At that time, most intersections in King William Street were constantly manned during day shift hours to assist the traffic at peak periods as a busy tram service also operated in that street

Constable Parker, who was dressed in uniform and I in plainclothes, immediately went to the nearby building where the alleged indecent behaviour had occurred. As we were approaching it via a laneway, a male person ran out of the door which was normally used as a fire escape. This person was about 50 yards ahead of us and we could see that he was wearing a fawn coloured suit but it was not possible to further identify him as we had only a fleeting glance before he turned into Pirie Street. We both believed he was the person we were seeking in relation to the allegation of indecent behaviour and that he had decided to run from the building when he noticed the uniform police officer approaching. When we reached Pirie Street, we saw a person in a fawn suit disappear into Gawler Place. We continued to pursue him but as I was a little faster, there developed a gap between us. The large crowd of pedestrians in the area at the time believed the uniform officer was chasing me. Thinking they were doing a public duty, they kept grasping my arms and suit coat etc. This impeded my progress as I had to continually inform them that I was a police officer and we were pursuing another person.

When reaching Gawler Place the street was crowded with lunch hour pedestrians but I eventually espied the person we were seeking and he was continually looking to his right and left as if he expected someone to be following him. I eventually grabbed him and told him I was a police officer and I required him to accompany me to the building where an offence had been alleged to have been committed and where he was seen to hurriedly leave from.

He explained that he had an appointment with his solicitor and that he was running late. This factor also confirmed my suspicions he had a behavioural problem and that he was seeking advice and assistance for previous like problems. When the informant viewed the person he was adamant it was not the offender. I naturally apologised for not believing him and also asked him his reason for continually looking to his rear when hurrying along Gawler Place. He said, “As I was running late for my appointment I was endeavouring to see a public clock to check the actual time.”



Chas. Hopkins





                


Further Historical notes taken from letters written  by  William Charles Miller to Eleanor May Ewens.

Borroloola. June 18th 1911 (cont’d)


My boss has been away on patrol, his first since I arrived. He saw M.C.s Murphy and Kerin who have both withdrawn their applications for transfer. Murphy refuses to return to the Foot   Police, in fact all the old foot men are or have withdrawn their applications for transfer and since the Commissioner informed the Inspector that all Constables transferring from the N.T. to S.A. must return to their original positions. So far my application is unanswered. I am expecting that, when it is answered, it will be to the above effect. In that event, I have decided [after many sleepless nights or worry, vexation and consideration] not to accept a transfer to the Foot Police but to remain and see how things go in the N.T. My reasons for not excepting a transfer to the Foot Police are, first a dislike to night and street duty, the inducements offered in the Northern Territory and lastly I would not like to be the only F.C. to return out of six at present. I do not think that you would care to have your husband being out on night duty eight months out of twelve, in fact you said so to me once. Man being the bread winner the onus or responsibility is on me to secure a good living to provide for a wife and family. If I returned to Adelaide as an F.C. we could live comfortably but I doubt if we could ever save an amount of money to enable me to be independent. If the country was unhealthy or  dangerous I would not have thought about asking you to come here. Since being here I have had splendid health. As M.C. Stott is expecting to leave the police service at the end of the year there is sure to be some changes and if I get a suitable Station, will expect you to make preparations to come here. Further details could be arranged later. I think that you would never regret coming here.


19/6/1911.


Mail has just arrived bringing me two letters from you dated 3/5/11 and 18/5/11. Last Sunday, yesterday, was the first after Trinity and before going to bed I read the Collect and Epistle for that day. They were beautiful. Look them up, too true about the weakness of    mortal nature. God understands everything, and being a God of Love cannot possibly forget that mankind is his handiwork. Nature tells me that there is a God whom I worship but I cannot believe Him to be cruel and  biased person as presented by the majority of religious sects who terrify the people with hell fire etc. Solitude and virgin nature has made me feel my own significance and has also made me reverence a Supreme Power more than  all the religious teaching I ever had.


Borroloola. Started August 27th 1911

I have been away all week at the Mines inspecting etc, which is in line that I know nothing about but I suppose I will learn in time. M.C. Collins has gone to Roper River in Will John’s place and my new man Giles ought to be at Anthony’s Lagoon tomorrow. He arrived here with a Scientific Geologist Dr. Woolnough on the 16th and left last Monday to escort him to Anthony’s. Wouldn’t be surprised if Dr. Woolnough did not give me a warm time in his report as I delayed him a few days, some of my horses had gone off their beat and it took the horse tailer three days to recover them and another day shoeing, in all four days but it was unavoidable. M.C. Giles is a young slight built man, a Territorian but knows nothing about police duty. It will sharpen me up a bit trying to instruct him while he is not out on patrol.

Next month: William plants his vegetable garden






TOP
Dorothy Pyatt OAM





On Tuesday the 4th September in the Ballroom at Government House, His Excellency the Governor,  Rear  Admiral Kevin Scarce AO CSC RANR invested Miss Dorothy Pyatt with the medal of the Order of Australia.

The Governor General, His Excellency Major General Michael Jeffery AC CVO MC (Retd.) congratulated Dorothy at a recent luncheon at the Royal United Services Institute at Keswick Barracks.





TOP


FACINATING
CON-MEN.




In 1872, veteran prospectors Philip Arnold and John Slack bought $35,000 worth of diamonds in Europe and scattered them on land in Wyoming. They managed to convince the Bank of San Francisco they had discovered a  diamond field and made $700,000.
     
Starting in 1921, Oscar Merril Hartzell began a scam selling fake shares in the estate of Sir Francis Drake. He contacted as many families as he could find with the surname Drake and was eventually accused of defrauding  270,000 people. The hoax netted him over $2,000,000.

When J. Bam Morrison arrived at Wetumka, Oklahoma in 1950, he claimed to  be the advance publicity man for Bohn's United Circus, which, he  maintained, was due to hit town in three weeks. He allegedly sold  advertising space to local traders... for a circus that didn't exist.

By forging signatures, James Addison Reavis was able to claim he was the  legal owner of 17,000 square miles of Arizona. The enterprise raked in  $300,000 a year until he was arrested in 1895 and he was sentenced to six years in prison.

Joseph Weill, who inspired the movie "The Sting," rented abandoned banks and convinced businessmen that he had set up a genuine bank. He waited for  them to   deposit large sums of money  before shutting down and moving on to  the next town. This, plus some of his other scams, earned him over $6,000,000.







Friday 5th October at 8.00 pm'
                       
SPEAKER:  Trevor Porter.
                                          
SUBJECT:  Notable Crimes in S.A.



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Twenty-one years ago tomorrow, an unassuming man named Clifford Cecil Bartholomew shocked Australia when he killed ten members of his family in an isolated farmhouse near Hope Forest. Police reporter Nigel Hunt, profiles the detective responsible for putting many of South Australia’s most notorious murderers behind bars.

It was as an eager, 17 year old police cadet that Allen Arthur had his first, very personal encounter with murder. In a wry twist of fate, one of the three victims in the infamous Sundown station case of 1958 was his close friend Thomas Whelan.
Shocked by the death, the young cadet looked on as local detectives, in their uniform grey hats, pieced together the crime and tracked down the killer. And he was acutely aware when the convicted man was hanged in the old Adelaide Gaol, a stone’s throw from where he was completing his training. The incident, which made a lasting impression, was instrumental in shaping his career.

Today, Senior Sergeant Allen Arthur, 52, is a detective in South Australia’s Major Crime Task Force. A veteran of almost 34 years in the South Australia Police Department, he established a reputation of one of our most experienced and respected homicide detectives, having investigated almost 100 murders or suspicious deaths and put behind bars some of the State’s most brutal killers.
He was responsible for the investigation of Australia’s largest mass murder by gun – an atrocity committed by Clifford Cecil Bartholomew at Hope Forrest on September 6, 1971, when ten people were slain.

While it is his biggest murder inquiry to date, Sergeant Arthur has presided over others of prominence, including the Van Beelan case, the West Lakes car bombing, the 1969 kidnapping of 19 year old Monica Schiller and the 1972 Wallace murder, which resulted in the arrest of John Neil Hayes, the son of the then Lord Mayor of Adelaide.

Detective Senior Sergeant Arthur is one of the last of the “old school” of detectives who, along with such other well-known investigators as Jack Zeunert [deceased], John McCall [deceased], Ron Thomas and Don Maddern, have formed the backbone of homicide investigation in this State for the past 25 years. Recently he has been involved in the Tran murder in Chinatown, the McKernan murder at Port Hughes, and the disappearance and presumed murder of Italian tourist Anna Liva at Coober Pedy.
As a junior uniform constable at Port Adelaide, Sergeant Arthur was impatient to join the CIB and investigate serious crimes. Within four years he got his chance. His first posting was with the anti-larrikin squad, which essentially tackled youth crime.
After returning in 1966 from a year in Cyprus as part of a United Nations peace-keeping force, he joined the Elizabeth CIB and, then in September, 1968, the fledgling Homicide Squad. His mentor in the squad was the late John McCall. McCall had a peculiar habit of daily visiting the City Morgue, then located on West Terrace, to gain an insight into how people had died. Those excursions were to become an invaluable part of Sergeant Arthur’s training.

The ability to recognise the cause of death – to be able to distinguish between the suspicious and non-suspicious, accident and suicide – is a crucial part of his job.
After 12 years in Homicide, Sergeant Arthur was transferred to Port Adelaide CIB and, later, Burnside CIB, eventually leaving the squad for nine years due to family commitments. In 1989, when he returned, it had been renamed the Major Crime Squad.
On his first day back, he was assigned to the brutal murder of Carey Gully man Keith Lamb. Lamb’s decomposing body was found hidden in bushes on a property at Carey Gully. After a lengthy inquiry, Lamb’s landlord, John Farquhar, was charged with murder. Farquhar pleaded guilty and received a 34 year non-parole period when sentenced.
However, none of the murders he has investigated remain with him as vividly as the Hope Forest massacre of 1971, when Clifford Cecil Bartholomew shot dead 10 people in his family, including his wife, his sister-in-law, his seven children and his baby nephew.
Although relatively inexperienced in homicide at the time, Sergeant Arthur was responsible for the prosecution brief that led to Bartholomew’s death sentence. This later was commuted to life imprisonment, and Bartholomew eventually was released after serving eight years. Sergeant Arthur recalls the morning he was assigned the job.
“The duty sergeant told me to get myself into work pretty quickly because 10 people had been shot in a house down south,” he says. “I thought he was joking.|

With his then partner Bill Richter, Sergeant Arthur witnessed the result of Bartholomew’s 30 minute reign of terror.
“When I got there and walked into the house, I couldn’t believe it,” he says.  “I had never seen so many dead people in one group before and I have not since.”
“You couldn’t walk in a straight line through the house down the passageway without stepping over or stepping around dead bodies, it’s something I will never forget.”
Sergeant Arthur’s experience has made him all too well aware that public apathy often hampers murder inquiries.
In 1972, a woman named Eileen Hutchinson disappeared from Mansfield Park and was missing for more than four months without trace, despite police inquiries. During that time, drinkers at the Mansfield Park Hotel openly discussed her association with two men named Bockman and Kennewell. They even nominated the pair as being responsible for her disappearance.
Finally, a hotel patron contacted police regarding the stories. Soon after, Eileen Hutchenson’s body was found at Port Gawler and charges were laid against Bockman and Kennewell.

Bockman eventually was sentenced to death but it was commuted to life imprisonment, while Kennewell was sentenced to 18 months jail for being an accessory. The hotel gossip was correct.
An optimist, Sergeant Arthur says the incident is a constant reminder that in most, if not all, homicides, someone, somewhere, has some information that could help with the investigation.

He says the Hutchinson scenario is one that is applicable to many investigations presently under way in the Major Crime Task Force.
While they may be stalled for lack of fresh leads, one telephone call or interview with the right person could lead to a breakthrough.
“In most successful investigations where the question is who did it, there is no magic formula to solving it,” Sergeant Arthur says.
“It is an information-seeking and gathering process, and if people withhold that information the job becomes more difficult.”
“With all the forensic techniques available today we may well have all the answers about things such as blood grouping, fingerprints, ballistics, and so on, but unless you have someone to compare these things with, the investigation can flounder.”
It is this situation, often compounded when the identity of the killer is known but there is not enough information to act, that causes frustration.
“There are a number of cases where we are satisfied we know who did the killing but we lack the evidence of the standard required by the courts to be able to proceed against them,” Sergeant Arthur says.
An example of this was the murder of 19 year old schoolgirl Lina Marciano in March, 1978. Her battered body was found wrapped in a curtain at the Dry Creek rubbish dump.

Late last year vital new information on the case came to light. “I am more confident now than ever before that the case will be solved successfully,” Sergeant Arthur says. ”People have to remember, we have time on our side.”

On his first day back, he was assigned to the brutal murder of Carey Gully man Keith Lamb. Lamb’s decomposing body was found hidden in bushes on a property at Carey Gully.   After a lengthy inquiry, Lamb’s landlord, John Farquhar, was charged with murder. Farquhar pleaded guilty and received a 34 year non-parole period when  sentenced.
The ability to recognise the cause of death – to be able to distinguish between the suspicious and non-suspicious, accident and suicide – is a crucial part of his job.
After 12 years in Homicide, Sergeant Arthur was transferred to Port Adelaide CIB and, later, Burnside CIB, eventually leaving the squad for nine years due to family commitments. In 1989, when he returned, it had been renamed the   Major Crime Squad.
However, none of the murders he has  investigated remain with him as vividly as the Hope Forest massacre of 1971, when Clifford Cecil Bartholomew shot dead 10 people in his family, including his wife, his sister-in-law, his seven children and his baby nephew.
Although relatively inexperienced in  homicide at the time, Sergeant Arthur was  responsible for the prosecution brief that led to Bartholomew’s death sentence. This later was commuted to life imprisonment, and  Bartholomew eventually was released after serving eight years. Sergeant Arthur recalls the morning he was assigned the job.
“The duty sergeant told me to get myself into work pretty quickly because 10 people had been shot in a house down south,” he says. “I thought he was joking.|
With his then partner Bill Richter, Sergeant Arthur witnessed the result of Bartholomew’s 30 minute reign of terror.
“When I got there and walked into the house, I couldn’t believe it,” he says.  “I had never seen so many dead people in one group before and I have not since.”
“You couldn’t walk in a straight line through the house down the passageway without  stepping over or stepping around dead bodies, it’s something I will never forget.”

Sergeant Arthur’s experience has made him all too well aware that public apathy often hampers murder inquiries.
In 1972, a woman named Eileen Hutchinson disappeared from Mansfield Park and was  missing for more than four months without trace, despite police inquiries. During that time, drinkers at the Mansfield Park Hotel openly  discussed her association with two men named Bockman and Kennewell. They even nominated the pair as being responsible for her disappearance.
Finally, a hotel patron contacted police       regarding the stories. Soon after, Eileen Hutchenson’s body was found at Port Gawler and charges were laid against Bockman and Kennewell.  Bockman eventually was sentenced to death but it was commuted to life imprisonment, while Kennewell was sentenced to 18 months jail for being an accessory. The hotel gossip was correct.
An optimist, Sergeant Arthur says the         incident is a constant reminder that in most, if not all, homicides, someone, somewhere, has some information that could help with the      investigation.
He says the Hutchinson scenario is one that is applicable to many investigations presently   under way in the Major Crime Task Force.
While they may be stalled for lack of fresh leads, one telephone call or interview with the right person could lead to a breakthrough.
“In most successful investigations where the question is who did it, there is no magic formula to solving it,” Sergeant Arthur says.
“It is an information-seeking and gathering process, and if people withhold that information the job becomes more difficult.”
“With all the forensic techniques available today we may well have all the answers about things such as blood grouping, fingerprints,   ballistics, and so on, but unless you have     someone to compare these things with, the     investigation can flounder.”

It is this situation, often compounded when the identity of the killer is known but there is not enough information to act, that causes frustration.
“There are a number of cases where we are satisfied we know who did the killing but we lack the     evidence of the standard required by the courts to be able to proceed against them,” Sergeant Arthur says.
An example of this was the murder of 19 year old schoolgirl Lina Marciano in March, 1978. Her         battered body was found wrapped in a curtain at the Dry Creek rubbish dump.
Late last year vital new information on the case came to light. “I am more confident now than ever    before that the case will be solved successfully,” Sergeant Arthur says. ”People have to remember, we have time on our side.”




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Christmas & 30th Anniversay Dinner.


By now you should have received your personal invitation to our 30th November celebration.  Once again space will be at a premium, as a consequence, numbers are limited.  You are urged to get your booking slip (with payment) in as soon as possible. as we are already getting close to a  sell out !

Members who wish to bring their spouse, partner or friends, who are not financial members,  please note that the cost for a non member is $30.00.



CRIMINAL HUMOUR.
In Portsmouth, R.I., police charged Gregory Rosa, 25, with a string of  vending machine robberies  in January when he:

          1) fled from police inexplicably when they spotted him loitering around a vending machine &
          2)later tried to post his $400 bail in coins.
     
     Karen Lee Joachimmi, 20, was arrested in Lake City, Florida for robbery of  a Howard Johnson's  motel.    She was armed with only an electric chain saw, which was not  plugged in.







At 6.15 am on Saturday 25th August, the Police Historical Society  vehicles, Chrysler Royal, Holden Sedan, two solo B.S.A. motor cycles (on trailer), commenced a trip to Loxton, to participate in the Loxton Centenary Parade, in the presence of His Excellency, Rear Admiral Kevin Scarce AO CSC RANR, Governor of South Australia.  



 




Vehicles & members, Mark Dollman, Kevin Johnson, Dave Aylett & Ernie McLeod, travelled to Tailem Bend (stopping for a light breakfast) then on to Loxton, arriving at 10.05 am.

At 11.30 am, Police Historical vehicles lead the parade through the township— 2 B.S.A. solo motor cycles, followed by the Chrysler Royal & Holden Sedan, and some 130 floats. 

Police Historical Society members received a warm welcome from the local people & were kept busy with questions about the  Society & it’s vehicles.



At the invitation of Senior Constables Geoff  Gibson & Graham Cooper, members enjoyed a  short rest at  Loxton Police  Station, before Setting out on the return trip. 

During a brief stop at Karoonda  the team had the  opportunity to meet with many of the  locals who expressed great interest in the     vehicles & the  Society in general.



              

It was a very pleasant day with no problems encountered on the trip & all arrived home safely at 7.00 pm.




Ernie McLeod








August has been a quieter month for our tour guides but outside speaking engagements have been rather abundant.
with President Geoff Rawson very much in demand as a speaker.

On Saturday 4th August  Geoff  visited the Port Adelaide Volunteer Tour Guides Group  & spoke to an enthusiastic crowd on Police History in Port Adelaide. 

Sunday 5th August our volunteers entertained some 21 members of the Vauxhall Car Club with Devonshire morning tea, videos & Museum Tour.

On Tuesday 7th August, Geoff spoke to  Dernancourt Neighbourhood Watch members on the Sundown Murders.

Friday 10th August saw the launch of the “Gentle Bear Program” in our Meeting Room , special guest was our new Governor, Rear Admiral Kevin Scarce, AO CSC RANR,  with Geoff Rawson representing the Society.

On Friday 24th our busy President enthralled the Manningham Legacy Widows Club with a power point  presentation  on the Sundown Murders. 

Saturday 25th—our Vehicle section took part in the Loxton centenary celebrations (see  Page 11)



Monday the 27th was Rostrevor College’s day  with 37 year 4  Students touring the  Museum, Vehicle Shed & mounted division.

On Wednesday 29th August Shirley Hayward hosted a group of 18 ladies to morning tea and a Museum & Vehicle Shed Tour. Unfortunately the Mounted Area was off limits because of the current Equine Influenza  crisis, but the ladies really enjoyed their time with us, so much so that they would like to come back next year.

Friday 31st August 14 members of the Humber Car Club were treated to a talk on Police history, a tour of the  Museum & a Devonshire Supper. They are also looking forward to a return visit next year. 



Our sincere thanks to all those who assisted over the month, particularly Geoff for his untiring efforts on  behalf of the Society. 

The month of September will be quieter  for internal tours.  However, on Sunday the 23rd September, we will be hosting approx. 50 members of the Tea Tree Gully Rotary Club to a tour with barbeque lunch.  If you can spare a few hours  between 9.30 am & 2.30 pm  to assist it would be greatly appreciated. 
                   


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The “HUE & CRY” is  Published by the
South Australian
  Police Historical Society Inc.,
Thebarton Police Barracks
C/- G.P.O. Box 1539 
Adelaide 5001
S.A. 5083

.




Editor
Editor

Elees Pick

Web site

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www.sapolicehistory.org/


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